Taxis in Wednesbury

Yellow Wednesbury Taxis is a leading taxi and private hire firm based in the wednesbury area. It has been serving the community for the past 15 years. We specialise in private hire vehicles, minibus and taxis in the wednesbury.

  • Immaculate Modern Fleet
  • Local and National Service
  • Airport, Station & Port Transfer Specialists
  • Book 24 Hours a Day
  • We operate 365 Days a Year
  • Corporate Services
  • Meet and Greet Service
  • Minibus Services
  • Account Facilities
  • Our own in house disablity awarness programme
  • Every airport transfers has their own acocunt manager

We have over seventy drivers serving the needs of the community. Whether it be a family embarking on a summer holiday, a business traveller or picking up executives from the airport you can trust Yellow Taxis wednesbury to provide a professional and reliable service that will transport you safely, in comfort and, most importantly, on time every time.

Wednesbury is a market town in England’s Black Country, part of the Sandwell metropolitan borough in West Midlands, near the source of the River Tame.

It is believed that Wednesbury was originally founded as an Iron Age hill fort. The first authenticated spelling of the name was Wodensbyri, written in an endorsement on the back of the copy of the will of Wulfric Spot, dated 1004. Wednesbury is one of the few places in England to be named after a pre-Christian deity.

During the Anglo-Saxon period there are believed to have been two battles fought in Wednesbury, one in A.D. 592 and one in 715. According to The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle there was “a great slaughter” in 592 and “Ceawlin was driven out”. Ceawlin was a king of Wessex and the second Bretwalda, or overlord of all Britain. The second battle, in 715, was fought between Mercia (of which Wednesbury was part) and the kingdom of Wessex. Both sides allegedly claimed to have won the battle, although it is believed that the victory inclined to Wessex.

Historically Wednesbury is within Staffordshire; in 1086, the Domesday Book describes Wednesbury (Wadnesberie) as being a thriving rural community encompassing Bloxwich and Shelfield (now part of Walsall). During the Middle Ages the town was a rural village, with each family farming a strip of land with nearby heath being used for grazing. The town was held by the king until the reign of Henry II, when it passed to the Heronville family.

Medieval Wednesbury was very small, and its inhabitants would appear to have been farmers and farm workers. In 1315, coal pits were first found and recorded in Wednesbury, which led to an increase in the number of jobs offered there. Nail making was also in progress during these times. William Paget was born in Wednesbury in 1505, the son of a nail maker. He is noted as having risen to the position of Secretary of State, a Knight of the Garter and an Ambassador. He was one of executors of the will of Henry VIII.

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